Learning Portfolio 4 – Item 2

Question 4: Presumed, Reputed, Surface & Earned Credibility

Presumed Credibility is a website based on the general assumption in the users mind. For example, the website en.wikipedia.org is presumed as a credible website, as well as it ends with a domain name .org.

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Reputed Credibility is based on a third-party endorsement, reports or referrals. For example, the website www.newyorker.com is a reputable website, as well as it has won the webby awards countless of times.

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Surface credibility is based on simple first impressions. For example the website www.nab.com.au, NAB is a banking website that is easy to use, updated frequently and professionally designed, having an aesthetic design.

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Earned Credibility is based on firsthand experience that extends over time. For example, the website www.google.com is the most popular search engine in the world, it has earned the credibility for how easy it is to use as well as the information given is accurate.

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Learning Portfolio 4

Question 3: Issues

  • The site has outdated information.
  • The site has way too many ads, making it hard to use.
  • Requiring for you to log in or sign up before using website.
  • Lack of knowledge on Web design doesn’t look professionally designed
  • The site has pop-up ads, with additional settings asking you if you want to leave the page or not.
  • The domain name is recognizable
  • Links are outdated, meaning a link that doesn’t work.
  • Unwanted downloads, meaning the site automatically forces you to download something before use.
  • Forcing you to complete a survey before browsing.
  • Providing links that are credible but redirecting you to an unwanted web page.
  • No photographs or information on organization members of the site.
  • Theft of personal information, while browsing the site.
  • The community-based website, covering reliable sources.
  • Site listing references for each source
  • No Ratings or peer reviews on web page
  • Unrepresented site.
  • Poor use of notification when buying off the site.
  • Poor customer service, meaning very slow or non-existent response
  • The site is difficult to browse around/to use.
  • Paid subscription just to browse the site.
  • Site note letting you view old posts meaning not able to.
  • Not multiplatform available meaning can’t access through phone, tablets, etc.
  • Site has many posts but barely any information to the posts

Learning Portfolio 4

Question 2: Wikipedia

Wikipedia is a very useful source sometimes, though can be very deceiving as well. As we all know the internet is used by everyone, Wikipedia is an encyclopedia that is built collaboratively, but collaborative to who, to everyone, the Wikipedia home page is welcome to Wikipedia the free encyclopedia that anyone can edit. That means anyone can just edit anything on Wikipedia even without an account, some might not even cite where they got the information from, so how would you know what is reliable on Wikipedia?(Fogg, 2003) This doesn’t mean all information in Wikipedia is fake or unreliable, Wikipedia is still a good place to get a good knowledge but not suitable for university use since it’s not trustworthy, expertise or credible. Though to find some good sources Wikipedia can help by looking at the reference and see where the person got the information from knowing if it’s a credible source or not, then actually read that source instead of the Wikipedia information. People perceive referenced information more credible (Go, You, Jung & Shim, 2016).

Fogg, B. J. (2003). Credibility and the World Wide Web. In Persuasive Technology: Using Computers to Change What We Think and Do (pp. 147‐181). Amsterdam: Morgan Kaufmann

Go, E., You, K. H., Jung, E., & Shim, H. (2016). Why do we use different types of websites and assign them different levels of credibility? Structural relations among users’ motives, types of websites, information credibility, and trust in the press. Computers in Human Behavior, 54, 231-239. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2015.07.046

Learning Portfolio 4

Question 1: Credibility Importance

Evaluation of credibility of a website is crucial for believability since there are billions of people around the world and are connected to the internet, how do you know what information is believable or not. That’s what Credibility is, it is believability it’s how believable the website or information is, the two major components credibility comes from are trustworthiness and expertise. To evaluate an information we need to know how trustworthy it is, is the source true, fair and unbiased and the perceived knowledge, skill and expertise on the topic. (Fogg, 2003). As we all know, thanks to the internet we can get information from the internet every day and for everything, work, studies, hobbies, etc. more easily than ever. Though questions have been raised by scholars about why and how people use the source (Go, You, Jung & Shim, 2016). Deception is an everyday thing though it has only been recent, researchers started to investigate deception through computer-mediated communication (CMC). Since the internet, daily communications is more often now, and we need to know that there is little reason that deception through CMC is any less than what occurs face to face (George, Giordano & Tilley, 2016).  For example as a university student, I need to know what resources is credible or not for my researches and essays, etc. Without knowing what source is credible, how do I know that my paper is going to be reliable?

Fogg, B. J. (2003). Credibility and the World Wide Web. In Persuasive Technology: Using Computers to Change What We Think and Do (pp. 122‐125). Amsterdam: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers.

George, J. F., Giordano, G., & Tilley, P. A. (2016). Website credibility and deceiver credibility: Expanding prominence-interpretation theory. Computers in Human Behavior, 54, 83-93. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2015.07.065

Go, E., You, K. H., Jung, E., & Shim, H. (2016). Why do we use different types of websites and assign them different levels of credibility? Structural relations among users’ motives, types of websites, information credibility, and trust in the press. Computers in Human Behavior, 54, 231-239. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2015.07.046